Positive/ Negative practice

This behavioral treatment is prescribed primarily for patients with nonorganic voice disorders. A patient with a nonorganic voice disorder has been diagnosed with aberrant voice production due to the abnormal use of a normal mechanism, often due to stress or some sort of secondary gain. She or he may have been ‘stuck’ with the abnormal voice for months to years, or may lurch between normal and abnormal voice production on an apparently involuntary basis. To help patients first “find” their normal voices, the clinician guides the patient through a variety of vocal elicitations such as: a yell, glissando, siren, or vocal fry. All of this may be with or without clinician digital manipulation of the laryngeal framework. After preliminarily ‘settling in’ the patient’s reestablished normal voice, the clinician quickly asks the patient to alternate between the re-established normal voice and the old abnormal voice. First, the patient alternates upon clinician cue, again optionally with or without digital manipulation, and then the patient demonstrates the ability to switch between the two kinds of voice production at the sentence level, and then every few words, and then word-by-word. The positive and negative practice demonstrates mastery / control over the abnormal/ nonorganic voice production. If possible, this process should occur with patient, clinician, and family/ friends in attendance. Other doctors, speech pathologists, pulmonologists, and allergists who may have previously attempted to help the patient using medical rather than behavioral treatments should also be made aware of the nature of the patient’s diagnosis, the purely behavioral approach to it, and the idea that behavioral intervention to resolve this problem completely should not normally exceed three visits to a speech pathologist, to avoid his or her becoming a co-dependent or source of secondary gain.

Listen to a few demonstrations below:

Mucosal chatter

The term ‘vocal cord chatter’ describes the audible phenomenon one hears when the voice starts and stops in rapid alternation because the mucosa is at the edge of its ability to vibrate at a given pitch, loudness, and subglottal air pressure. So, it “catches” the airstream and vibrates for a fraction of a second, then stops, then restarts, then stops, etc. The best understanding is gained through audio and video examples.

Patient examples:

Segmental vibration


Photos:

False cord phonation

Making voice by vibrating the false vocal cords. This kind of phonation is unlike normal phonation or voice-making, which uses the true vocal cords.

False cord phonation produces a much deeper, rougher voice quality than normal phonation. It is purposefully used in certain kinds of vocal performance, such as Tibetan chant or heavy metal screaming. It can also occasionally serve as an alternate voice for a person whose true cords are unable to vibrate—due, for example, to their surgical removal or to scarring. It can also be produced concurrently with true cord phonation to produce a “Louis Armstrong” effect.


Photos:

Audio:

True cord phonation

False cord phonation

True and false cord phonation

Vocal instability

This characteristic might manifest most clearly during sustained phonation as a glitch, catch, wavering, tremor, in-and-out vocal fry, or other such finding. In each case, the patient would be unable, partially able, or only intermittently able to produce a steady and predictable voice.


Teflon

A synthetic material, polytetrafluoroethylene, most popularly associated with non-stick cooking pans. Until 25 or so years ago, it was common to treat paralyzed vocal cords by injecting a paste of Teflon particles deep within the cords. Teflon was an effective treatment for its time, but it occasionally caused granuloma formation and required late debulking.

Today, injected materials such as hyaluronic acid gel or hydroxyapatite particles suspended in hyaluronic acid are typically used instead for temporary or somewhat permanent rehabilitation. For permanent rehabilitation of permanent paralysis, surgically implanted silastic wedges are used most often, though other materials are also used optionally.


Photos:


Audio with photos:

Interview:


The patient describes original problem with Teflon granuloma/ overinjection, and the improvement after debulking Teflon.

Flaccidity of vocal cords

Photos of Flaccidity:


Voice Building:

Voice Building (shorter version):

Bowing of the vocal cords

This is a descriptive term to specify that the vocal cords are not matching in a straight line, with only a thin dark line between them at the moment of pre-phonation. Instead, the cords become gently concave or bowed outwards. At the moment of pre-phonation, there is a wider, oval slit between the cords.

Bowing can be physiologic, asymptomatic, and a genetic “given.” In this physiologic type, the bowing will be subtle to mild and there will be good vibratory pattern. When moderate or severe, bowing may more likely be the result of aging, vocal disuse, Parkinson’s disease, or other conditions. Moderate and severe bowing correlate with a degree of vocal cord atrophy and the vibratory pattern can be more flaccid. The voice tends to have a soft-edged quality and to fade with use. Voice building is the primary treatment, but very occasionally severe bowing is treated with bilateral vocal cord implants.


Photos:


Voice Building:

Voice Building (shorter version):

Voice building

Voice building is the process of adding strength to the voice by using a variety of tasks that tax its strength capabilities. The idea is that over time the larynx will rise to the challenge and adapt to increased demands, much as might happen to the arms as a result of a weight-lifting regimen. Sometimes the voice building regimen is very simple and “do-it-yourself”; other times it is more sophisticated and requires the assistance of a speech pathologist who is singing voice qualified.


Voice Building:

Voice Building (shorter version):