Inspiratory Phonation

When voice is produced using inhaled air. By contrast, normal voice production uses exhaled air. Voice production with inhaled air is often involuntary or unintentional—for example, a gasp of surprise, or with a person whose vocal cords are scarred or paralyzed in a nearly closed position. Inspiratory phonation is also more limited with respect to pitch range and loudness than is normal, expiratory phonation.


Photos:

Reinke’s (smoking-related) edema and how to see it: Series of 4 photos

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Abducted, breathing position of vocal cords

Convexed vocal cords (1 of 4)

Abducted, breathing position. Note that the margin of both vocal cords is slightly convex. See dotted line for normal, perfectly straight margin.
Inspiratory phonation

Inspiratory phonation (2 of 4)

Inspiratory phonation in-draws the mild Reinke’s edema (smoker’s type polyp formation).
Open phase, faint translucency

Open phase, faint translucency (3 of 4)

Strobe illumination, at E4 (approximately 330 Hz), mostly open phase.
Closed phase, faint translucency

Closed phase, faint translucency (4 of 4)

Note again in closed phase.

Videos:

Smoker’s Polyps (aka Polypoid Degeneration or Reinke’s Edema)
This video illustrates how smoker’s polyps can be seen more easily when the patient makes voice while breathing in (called inspiratory phonation). During inspiratory phonation, the polyps are drawn inward and become easier to identify.